community

Community

We are committed to supporting community and environmental projects, with an emphasis on initiatives with links to water and swimming. Our activities include:

SUPPORTING LOCAL WILDLIFE

Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust is run by local people for the benefit of local wildlife, and manages over 70 nature reserves.

We have been supporting their efforts since 2007, and Speedo employees get involved by volunteering to help with conservation efforts at meadows near our office. We sponsor the Trust’s “Wildlife in the Wetlands” project, which raises awareness about the importance of conserving wetland habitats for UK native species such as otters and water voles.

INSPIRING CHILDREN TO SWIM

We are helping lead efforts to inspire children in the socially-deprived Nottingham area of St. Ann’s and Snienton to swim. Our goal is to give the children the chance to learn to swim, helping to boost their confidence and giving them a safe and sporty after-school activity.

We have helped create a swim club by donating 2,500 pieces of swimwear and £2,000 to run coaching sessions at Nottingham University’s swimming pool. The swim club is a collaboration between Speedo, the EPIC partnership (a group of schools and other organisations making a difference to disadvantaged communities) and the Youth Sports Trust (which works to improve young people’s prospects through exercise and sport).

WORLD SWIM AGAINST MALARIA

Speedo supports the World Swim Against Malaria, which calls on swimmers everywhere to raise funds to fight one of the world’s deadliest diseases. By doing a sponsored swim, people can help The Against Malaria Foundation, organisers of the event, to buy and distribute mosquito nets that can prevent the spread of the disease. To date the charity has distributed around 2.5 million nets globally.

LEWIS GORDON PUGH

We sponsor British endurance swimmer and green campaigner Lewis Gordon Pugh, renowned for completing extreme swims to raise awareness about environmental issues. He has worn Speedo while highlighting the impacts of climate change by swimming across open sea – formerly frozen solid – at the North Pole and a Himalayan lake formed by melting glaciers.